Cardiff Aviation said there has been a two week delay in paying staff but payments will be made before Easter

The aviation company chaired by Bruce Dickinson has confirmed it is late in paying its staff.

Cardiff Aviation, based at St Athan in the Vale of Glamorgan, currently employs around 150 specialising in aircraft maintenance and repair, as well as providing pilot training.

In a statement the company said: “There has been a delay of two weeks in payment of wages. We have apologised for this and payments are scheduled to be made before Easter.”

It comes at the business continues to negotiate over unpaid rent for the facilities it leases at St Athan from the Welsh Government.

A meeting was scheduled last week between Cardiff Aviation and the Welsh Government to hammer out a solution, through a process of mediation.

It has not paid rent at its Twin Peaks hangar facility since setting up in 2012.

Bruce Dickinson, speaking to WalesOnline last month, confirmed has invested £4m of his own money into the three businesses that make up Cardiff Aviation, the maintenance and repair organisation, a pilot training business and an airline which operates on behalf of other airlines.

He added: “That represents a massive personal commitment from me. I’m not looking for it back, I’m quite happy to have made that commitment, to build the business forward.”

One of the issues for the business is that restrictions on the landing facilities at St Athan means that the company has not been able to attract as much business in the past as it hoped – and one major airline, Easyjet, walked away after having had three aircraft repaired, with the airline saying the difficulties with the availability of the airfield was a problem.

Bruce said: ” The problem is an instrument landing system (ILS) at St Athan, which belongs to the MOD.”

But Dickinson says he’s hopeful that a solution might soon be forthcoming.

“I believe that they’ve come to an agreement about how to use it which is effectively the solution that we suggested two years ago,” he said.

“It’s taken them two years to come to an agreement with the MoD about the use of the ILS, which was paid for by the Welsh Government and installed at vast expense to the public purse and which has never been used in anger, even though it works perfectly well. I brought an aircraft in from Djibouti the other day and we got the ILS 40 miles away.

“The attitude of the new RAF base commander at St Athan is very positive and I think that’s helped things along.”

Source: Wales Online

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